Most Popular on Netflix: A Look at Today's Top 10

Movies Lists Netflix
Share Tweet Submit Pin
Most Popular on Netflix: A Look at Today's Top 10

Netflix has been notoriously stingy with its data. Even directors and showrunners have had a hard time gauging if what they’d put out into the world was reaching its intended audience. With the advent of the Netflix Top 10, though, we can now get at least one little peek behind the curtain. The list of Netflix’s daily Top 10 Most Popular indicates an omnivorous appetite among the Netflix faithful, from reality shows to prestige TV, animated kids shows to docu-series of every stripe. Here are the entries for Nov. 29, 2022, of the five most popular TV shows and five most popular movies on Netflix.

TV Series

1. Wednesday

Year: 2022
Creator: Alfred Gough, Miles Millar
Stars: Jenna Ortega, Emma Myers, Gwendoline Christie, Riki Lindhome, Christina Ricci, Jamie McShane, Hunter Doohan, Percy Hynes White, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Luis Guzmán
Genre: Fantasy, Teen
Rating: TV-14

Watch on Netflix

Ever since their 1938 debut in The New Yorker, the Addams Family have long been considered a pop culture staple as they’ve cemented their presence in all sorts of comics, animated television shows, and full-length feature films. The dark and kooky nature of family members Gomez, Morticia, Wednesday, and Pugsley have long provided a more eccentric form of entertainment, yet they remain timeless within the public sphere. Perhaps the most compelling of them all is little Wednesday Addams, the sinister child of woe most recognized by her classic braids, dry wit, and disturbing love for violence. It makes complete sense, then, that Tim Burton—master of all things macabre—would attach his name to Netflix’s new series dedicated to this goth icon. Wednesday is a supernatural horror-comedy series that answers one essential question: What does Wednesday Addams look like as a teenager? After getting expelled from public school for releasing piranhas in the pool, a 16-year-old Wednesday (Jenna Ortega) is shipped off to Nevermore Academy, a preppy boarding school for Outcasts. Nevermore boasts a variety of nutty characters, serving as a haven for anyone different or harboring special abilities, including vampires, werewolves, gorgons, and sirens. The most compelling aspects of the show are in the season’s exploration into Wednesday’s relationships with those around her, which she finds particularly challenging to navigate as it’s so vehemently against her independent life philosophy. — Dianna Shen


2. 1899

Year: 2022
Creator: Jantje Friese, Baran bo Odar
Stars: Emily Beecham, Aneurin Barnard, Andreas Pietschmann, Miguel Berardeau
Genre: Mystery, Supernatural Thriller
Rating: TV-MA

Watch on Netflix

Jantje Friese and Baran bo Odar have earned patience. The German creators of the cult mystery-thriller Dark forced their viewers to trust them. Through three seasons of Dark very little made sense, as Friese and bo Odar kept a growing audience largely, well, in the dark. With their new Netflix show, 1899, the creators follow the same path, crafting a world shrouded in mystery, and often, confusion. With a massive ensemble of European actors, the mystery series follows a ship heading towards America. When encountering another vessel that had been missing for several months, the captain, Eyk (Andreas Pietschmann), decides to investigate, setting off a sea of events which make little to no sense at first glance. Pietschmann, a Dark alumnus, commands the majority of scenes alongside Emily Beecham, the latter of whom plays an English passenger who is central to the story Friese and bo Odar attempt to tell. Both seem more than up to the task, as does the rest of this large cast, composed of characters speaking their own native languages—a disconnect both internal and external when watching 1899. For first-time watchers of Friese and bo Odar, 1899 might be too discombobulated to enjoy. It will lose viewers with its lack of satisfying answers, and its disconnected language gamble. But the mystery shifts and buzzes when given time and energy. It snatches at you, gnaws at you, wants to nestle inside your mind as you await the next episode, even if the story is as jumbled as many have experienced. It remains to be seen what this mystery is all about, but I’ll continue to be on this journey. Friese and bo Odar have earned my, and many others’, patience. —Michael Frank


3. Dead to Me

Year: 2022
Creator: Liz Feldman
Stars: Christina Applegate, Linda Cardellini, James Marsden, Max Jenkins, Ed Asner
Genre: Comedy, Thriller
Rating: TV-MA

Watch on Netflix

Jen (Christina Applegate) and Judy (Linda Cardellini) meet not so cute at a grief support group. Jen’s husband died three months ago in a hit and run accident. Judy’s fiancé died eight weeks ago of a heart attack. They develop a friendship over their mutual anguish and their love of Facts of Life (Jen is a Jo, Judy a Tootie). Before long Judy is moving into Jen’s guest house and a beautiful friendship is formed. Or is it? Netflix is keen on keeping the pilot’s big reveal a secret. I watched it with my husband and didn’t even let him know there was a secret and he still guessed it within minutes of the show’s opening. But no matter. The series, rooted in terrific performances from Applegate and Cardellini, is a fascinating mix of humor and pathos. The show deftly balances both extremes and pull both off. I never know what the twisty Dead to Me is really up to and that’s just the way I like it. —Amy Amatangelo


4. The Crown

Years: 2016-2022
Creator: Peter Morgan
Stars: Claire Foy, Matt Smith, Vanessa Kirby, Jeremy Northam, Victoria Hamilton, Anton Lesser, Matthew Goode, Olivia Colman, Emma Corrin, Josh O’Connor
Genre: Historical drama
Rating: TV-MA

Watch on Netflix

In its first two seasons, creator Peter Morgan’s lavish treatment of the reign of Queen Elizabeth II hinges on Claire Foy’s utterly captivating performance as the flinty monarch; the impeccable period detail; a sense of historical scope that outstrips its forebears. The third and fourth installments of Netflix’s opulent celebration of the monarchy opens in 1964 and romps through the following two decades. We’re introduced to a new cast to reflect the new timeframe: Olivia Colman as Queen Elizabeth II, Tobias Menzies is now Prince Philip, Margaret transforms into Helena Bonham Carter, and we are introduced to Prince Charles (Josh O’Connor), Princess Anne (Erin Doherty), and eventually, Emma Corrin as Diana, Princess of Wales. In Season 5, the show is most interested in grappling with grim realities and reflecting on mistakes. Characters survey a monarchy in crisis, multiple royal marriages in shambles, and roles in British society in fluctuation. And yet, even with a story that’s just as turbulent as last season, the new episodes are more subtle and nuanced as it explores the Royal family’s faults and struggles as one century ends and another begins. The result is quite beautiful. This is the most interesting season of The Crown yet, even pensive in its attitude and approach. The cracks are clear, the pieces fully shattered. The show is eager to look at the mess and at the past, and figure out how we got to where we are. —Allison Keene and Chris Panella


5. The Unbroken Voice

Year: 2022
Stars: Mariana Gómez, José Ramón Barreto, Yuri Vargas
Genre: Biopic, Drama, Romance
Rating: TV-MA

Watch on Netflix

Based on the early life of Colombian singer Arelys Henao, this music biopic series tells her unlikely rags-to-riches tale.


Movies

1. The Noel Diary

Year: 2022
Director: Charles Shyer
Starring: Justin Hartley, Barrett Doss, Essence Atkins, Bonnie Bedilia, James Remar
Genre: Romance, Christmas
Rating: PG

Watch on Netflix

Lookout Hallmark Channel, Netflix is churning out the PG-rated Christmas romances this year. The Noel Diary stars Justin Hartley as a successful author home for Christmas and Barrett Doss is searching for her birth mom when they meet-cute.


2. Ghislaine Maxwell: Filthy Rich

Year: 2022
Director: Lisa Bryant, Maiken Baird
Genre: True-crime documentary
Rating: TV-MA

Watch on Netflix

Netflix’s latest true-crime documentary covers the sex-trafficking trial of Ghislaine Maxwell, the infamous accomplice to Jeffrey Epstein and a socialite with connections to the rich and famous.


3. The Swimmers

Year: 2022
Director: Sally El Hosaini
Starring: Manal Issa, Nathalie Issa, Matthias Schweighöfer, Ahmed Malek, Ali Suliman, Kinda Alloush, James Krishna Floyd, Nahel Tzegai, Akuc Bol
Genre: Sports biopic
Rating: PG-13

Watch on Netflix

Sisters Manal and Nathalie Issa star as real-life sisters and professional swimmers Yusra and Sara Mardini who escaped war-torn Syria on dinghy across the Aegean Sea, using their swimming skills to drag other refugees to safety. Yusra went on to compete in the Olympics after training in Germany. Matthias Schweighöfer (Army of Thieves) stars as their coach, Sven.


4. Slumberland

Year: 2022
Director: Francis Lawrence
Starring: Jason Momoa, Marlow Barkley, Chris O’Dowd, Kyle Chandler, Weruche Opia, India De Beaufort, Humberly González
Genre: Family, Fantasy, Adventure
Rating: PG

Watch on Netflix

Declaring what our dreams look like, if such a sweeping declaration can be made, is asking for trouble, but I can certainly put forth what I hope our dreams don’t look like: I hope they don’t look a thing like Slumberland. Director Francis Lawrence deadens and dulls Winsor McCay’s classic comic Nemo in Slumberland, updating McCay’s bright and groundbreaking early 20th century absurdity to modern VFX’s best-practice aesthetic—namely, “dark, and in a big room.” Slumberland’s loose adaptation is Disneyfied in plot and theme, and self-smothering of a feeble imagination that barely outpaces its images. Slumberland’s Nemo (Marlow Barkley) lives an idyllic life running a lighthouse with her hot, bearded and cableknit widower dad Kyle Chandler. In the same kind of endearing yet inevitably tragic opening that comes pre-packaged into every children’s movie, Chandler’s perfect parental character is not long for this world. When he dies and Nemo is thrust into the care of her uptight urbanite uncle Philip (Chris O’Dowd), she finds herself escaping time and time again into the dream world, where she can briefly pursue her father alongside a dream-being who was the co-star of many of her father’s bedtime stories. This dream-being, Flip (Jason Momoa), is supposed to be the source of all the film’s energy. Momoa, who looks like Rob Zombie in a Willy Wonka costume, all but has this assignment written on his forehead. He’s growly and eccentric, with plenty of useless wibbly-wobbly Jack Sparrow tics, and has a little trouble talking through his Beauty and the Beast fangs. While Barkley is clearly out of her depth as our wide-eyed heroine, Momoa is equally ill-equipped to bring the Jack Black-like pop his karate moves, heel clicks and heroic poses try to generate. —Jacob Oller


5. Where the Crawdads Sing

Year: 2022
Director: Olivia Newman
Starring: Daisy Edgar-Jones, Taylor John Smith, Harris Dickinson, Michael Hyatt, Sterling Macer, Jr., David Strathairn
Genre: Drama, Romance
Rating: PG-13

Watch on Netflix

From the unwieldy title of Where the Crawdads Sing, you probably expect it to be set down ‘round the parts of America where you’re guaranteed some twang for your buck. Director Olivia Newman’s sophomore feature, based on the bestseller by Delia Owens, surely delivers on that Kentucky Fried notion. Its outsiders, romance and murder all possess the same cartoonish unreality as the rotating cast of actors donning the pressed suit, white goatee, black string tie and half-frame glasses of Colonel Sanders. The film struggles and thrashes, mired in an ideological quagmire as juicy as its love triangle, its naturalist feminism dragging down with it the soapy drama that extends a lifeline. With Owens’ source material as its sandy foundation, the film sinks into the marsh. In that marsh, in Barkley Cove, North Carolina, a young, well-bred hunk has turned up dead. The town outsider, Kya (Daisy Edgar-Jones), stands accused. Actually “Marsh Girl” stands accused, because that’s what everyone in town calls her. Did she do it? Was she sleeping with the hunk? And is that a lesson I smell brewing, or just the stagnant wetland? Where the Crawdads Sing is shallow, predictable and just broad enough that you can understand why it sold so well as a half-lurid paperback. —Jacob Oller