10 New Albums to Listen to Today

Featuring Neil Young & Crazy Horse, Weyes Blood, BROCKHAMPTON and more

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10 New Albums to Listen to Today

Paste is the place to kick off each and every New Music Friday. We follow our regular roundups of the best new songs by highlighting the most compelling new records you need to hear. Find the best of what this week has to offer below, from priority picks to honorable mentions.

Badge Époque Ensemble & Lammping: Clouds of Joy: Chance of Reign

Yes, the Badge Époque Ensemble and Lammping crew impressed us time and again on the singles released from their album Clouds of Joy: Chance of Reign, but obviously the question was—could they actually keep this going once they’re facing the nuances and dynamic requirements of a good album? Unsurprisingly, the Toronto-based groups answer with a resounding “Yes!” This project is a remix of the Ensemble’s last project Clouds of Joy, with the merging of these two creative groups producing a sleek, modern hip-hop take on the band’s jazz-funk sound, creating versions that still preserve the original warmth. All samples are used from the original album, with the same music being twisted to show something exciting in an entirely new way. Most importantly, it shows daring from both bands, the ability to take a piece of music and agree that it has many more lives and versions than just the first one that gets released. They continue to move into and combine new, different musical worlds, and keep pushing themselves to see what will come of it. —Rosa Sofia Kaminski

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BROCKHAMPTON: TM

BROCKHAMPTON gonna BROCKHAMPTON, even to the very end. Ahead of their “indefinite hiatus,” Kevin Abstract and company released their much-anticipated “final” album, The Family, and in the same breath announced another, a surprise “parting gift to their supporters” titled TM, out now. In fairness, TM does predate The Family—Kevin Abstract, Bearface and Romil Hemnani recorded the latter’s 17 tracks (including singles “Big Pussy” and “The Ending”) in the spring of 2022, with boylife and Bearface as executive producers. TM, on the other hand, is “made up of songs that were started by the group during a two-week stint in Ojai, California in 2021, but were never fully completed during those sessions,” per a press release. BROCKHAMPTON’s Matt Champion stepped in as executive producer to complete the album. Founder and de facto leader Kevin Abstract was the sole member of the boyband to appear on The Family, but TM is a full-band affair, offering listeners one last glimpse of BROCKHAMPTON as we knew it. —Scott Russell

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Caitlin Rose: CAZIMI

“Cazimi” is a term derived from Arabic literally meaning “in the heart of the sun.” In other words, when a planet is in cazimi, it’s so close to the sun that it’s in the “heart” of it. Total combustion might be just ahead, but the rays are blinding. Country singer Caitlin Rose’s take on the astrological phenomenon takes shape on her third album CAZIMI, which frequently finds the singer/songwriter, or one of her many characters, facing what happens just before they’re engulfed in flames. Rose herself, who found modest music stardom in her early 20s around the release of her buzzy full-length debut, Own Side Now, knows a thing or two about the space between exaltation and burnout. After the release of her 2013 second album The Stand-In, Rose took seven years off from music, a period that was defined by its own sets of fits and starts, ups and downs. When she was ready to return to music in early 2020, Rose decided to reinvent the idea of cazimi to better fit her motives for making a fresh album. Rather than be swarmed by flames, she found power in the light. —Ellen Johnson

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Fousheé: softCORE

The title of softCORE is a helpful shorthand for what to expect from it. The second album from Fousheé is lowercase one minute and ALL CAPS the next, as if the rising-star singer/songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and producer is focused, first and foremost, on confounding expectations. It makes for a thrilling listen: On “i’m fine,” Fousheé croons the titular assurance over delicate acoustic finger-picking one second, then hoarsely screams it over crushing metalcore the next, highlighting the range of emotions such defense mechanisms can mask. Her voice is a dance-punk shout over the industrial “die,” a teasing murmur on “simulation” as she insists on the unreality of everything, and a feathery falsetto on the avant-R&B of “unexplainable.” The sunny radio-pop fare of “smile” is followed by the aggro noise-rock of “stupid bitch,” and eventually, the album closes on the romantic reconciliation ballad “let u back in.” softCORE is a statement album from Fousheé, an assertion of independence that demonstrates the breadth of her elastic artistry. —Scott Russell

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Gladie: Don’t Know What You’re In Until You’re Out

The second album from Philadelphia rock quintet Gladie after 2020’s Safe Sins, Don’t Know What You’re In Until You’re Out vibrates with the bittersweet feelings of a new lease on life. Take single and proper opener (after atmospheric instrumental “Purple Year”) “Born Yesterday”: Vocalist/guitarist Augusta Koch (formerly of Cayetana) uses water imagery, evoking something far larger than herself, to communicate the rebirth she experienced by getting sober. “I was born yesterday / I forgot how to breathe already / Now the floodgates are open / The way I feel I could fill the ocean,” she sings over Miles Ziskind and Dennis Mishko’s pumping low end, and her, Matt Schimelfenig’ and Pat Conaboy’s driving guitars. There’s something terrifying about surrendering to those elemental forces, as well as something freeing—”I hit the ground running, I hit the ground,” Koch sings on the song of the same name, accepting that impact as the price of moving forward. She confronts that give and take throughout the record, pushing through growth’s pain to throw her arms around the person she’s become. —Scott Russell

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Nadine Khouri: Another Life

In a glimmering, soft darkness, Nadine Khouri’s new album Another Life beckons to you. It truly seems to have its hands outstretched in a strange sort of welcome, with Khouri’s gorgeously deep and velvet-lined voice being the first inviting impression about the album. The LP works well as a whole, with the minimalist instrumental arrangements never sounding too much the same across the spread of the project. Songs like the bubbling “Briefly Here” provide lovely, unexpected texture to the collection, while “The Broken Light” and “Lo-Fi Moon” see Khouri compassionately breaking your heart. “On the whole, I wanted this record to sound more direct than the previous one,” Khouri comments, “Though there is a lot on there about being in a liminal place, between past and present, presence and absence.” The in-between spaces are reveled in here; you don’t feel at all pinned down by the music, but instead given a lot of space to listen and connect to it. It is an album for breathing. —Rosa Sofia Kaminski

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Neil Young & Crazy Horse: World Record

Throughout the years, Neil Young has given himself over completely to his muse in whatever form it takes. His willingness to divert midstream can almost seem ruthless, whether it comes to neglecting the feelings of his high-profile bandmates in Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, dashing the expectations of label heads looking to cash in on his endless well of talent, adapting new gnarly sounds that threatened to scare away the patchwork pant-wearing crowd, or unleashing the hounds of hell on those who have annoyed him in his lyrics. But one bell he has consistently rung, ever since his early days, is his heartfelt need to warn anyone who will listen about the long-term effects of harmful pollution on our planet. With World Record, his latest with Crazy Horse—the most consistent backing band of his long career—Young and the fellas went back into the studio for a batch of tunes that, at their best, come off feeling like an unflinching and unfiltered plea for our dying planet. —Pat King

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Richard Dawson: The Ruby Cord

In the earliest months of 2020, Richard Dawson and his partner Sally Pilkington started a new project called Bulbils, setting about with a simple aim: record whatever was on their minds any given day and upload it as it was, without further tweaking. The result was something akin to a communal salve—mental relief from nascent pandemic worries performers and listeners might have been facing in their own lives—oft-delivered via meditative ambient textures of guitars, vocals, synths, and anything else Dawson and Pilkington might have felt the urge to use in the moment. Bulbils arrived shortly after Dawson’s prophetically titled 2020, his last solo studio album, and its immediate effect on his follow-up is palpable. The Ruby Cord marks both a culmination of and departure from the avant-folk style Dawson broke out with on 2017’s Peasant. Dawson’s compositions have always relished in eccentricities and sheltering hidden nooks just beneath the surface, be it in “Ogre” withholding its refrain until its climax or the hairpin turn into an Iron Maiden-esque riff on Circle collab track “Methuselah.” But The Ruby Cord sees the songwriter reaching for a profound patience heretofore unseen in his work, pairing a thoughtful variation on the unfurling ambient work of Bulbils with the empathetic storytelling of Peasant and 2020. —Natalie Marlin

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Veps: Oslo Park

Oslo, Norway-based quartet Veps (Norwegian for “wasp”) leave their teenage years behind with Oslo Park, their full-length debut and follow-up to 2021 EP Open the Door, produced by fellow Norwegian Matias Tellez (Girl in Red, Sondre Lerche). Helena M. Olasveengen (vocals/keys), Laura Dodson (vocals/guitar), June K. Urholt (bass, lead vocals on album closer “The Credits”) and Maja B. Berge (drums) met in elementary school and started playing music together at 14—you can practically hear the years they’ve shared in these songs, full of youthful imagination and emotion, not to mention warm, well-rounded indie-pop musicianship. Veps thread the needle between feeling the full force of young adulthood and examining those feelings from a more mature remove, processing it all in what feels like real time. “Mama said to be home before the sun goes down again / Everything was easier back then / Or so they say time and time again,” they sing on the ruminative “To the Bedwetters,” nostalgic for the good old days before they’ve even left them. —Scott Russell

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Weyes Blood: And In The Darkness, Hearts Aglow

Natalie Mering’s (Weyes Blood) newest LP, And In The Darkness, Hearts Aglow, picks up right where Titanic Rising left us in 2019. Even the album covers bear similar imagery. On the latter’s, Mering is underwater in a bedroom, suspended in an oceanic ether above a wine-red carpet. Light pours in through the bellowing, jellyfish-translucent curtains. It’s as if she’s stranded and the shipwreck has not yet sunken down to the seabed. On the cover of Hearts Aglow, Mering appears to still be below the surface, her hair drifting through the water like a slow-motion wave, her chest, quite literally, bursting with a sun-red gleam. There’s a stillness afoot, a rubble above ready to be pieced back together. And Mering is standing atop the debris. —Matt Mitchell

And don’t forget to check out … Billy Strings: ME/AND/DAD, Halo Maud: Pesnopoïka EP, Honey Dijon: Black Girl Magic, isomonstrosity: isomonstrosity, Maria BC: Hyaline Remixes EP, Mountain Goats: The Jordan Lake Sessions: Volume 5, Movulango: Mirror in Man, Neal Francis: Sentimental Garbage EP, Nickelback: Get Rollin’, Roddy Ricch: Feed The Street III, Röyksopp: Profound Mysteries III, Thaiboy Digital: Back 2 Life, The Wombats: Is This What It Feels Like To Feel Like This? EP